Accepted Papers

The following papers are accepted for presentation as the workshop.

  • Bozena Wozna-Szczesniak. Checking EMTLK properties of Timed Interpreted Systems via Bounded Model Checking
  • Qingliang Chen and Kaile Su. Higher-Order Epistemic Coalition Logic for Multi-Agent Systems
  • Emiliano Lorini and Roberto Ciuni. Comparing semantics for temporal STIT logic
  • Jan Broersen. Moral Responsibility, Alternative Possibility and Attempt
  • Natasha Alechina, Fenrong Liu and Brian Logan. Postulates and a linear-time algorithm for minimal preference contraction
  • Andreas Herzig, Emiliano Lorini, Faustine Maffre and Dirk Walther. Alternating-time Temporal Logic with Explicit Programs
  • Stefania Costantini and Giovanni De Gasperis. Runtime Self-Checking via Temporal (Meta-)Axioms for Assurance of Logical Agent Systems
  • Daniele Porello and Nicolas Troquard. Non-normal modal Linear Logic with an application to resource-sensitive agency
  • Daniel Eckert and Frederik Herzberg. A Simple Possibility Result in a Boolean-Valued Model for Judgment Aggregation
  • Fabio Mogavero, Aniello Murano and Luigi Sauro. On the Conjunctive and Disjunctive Fragments of Strategy Logic

Program

A PDF version of the workshop program is available here: Flyer of Workshop Program

Time Talk
9:00-9:05 Opening
9:05-10:05 Invited Tutorial by Prof. Thomas Ågotnes (University of Bergen, NO). The Social Laws Paradigm for Coordinating MAS
10:05-10:35 Daniele Porello and Nicolas Troquard. Non-normal Modal Linear Logic with an Application to Resource-sensitive Agency
10:35-11:00 Coffe Break
11:00-11:30 Emiliano Lorini and Roberto Ciuni. Comparing Semantics for Temporal STIT Logic
11:30-12:00 Jan Broersen. Moral Responsibility, Alternative Possibility and Attempt
12:00-12:15 Qingliang Chen and Kaile Su. Higher-Order Epistemic Coalition Logic for Multi-Agent Systems
12:15-12:30 Daniel Eckert and Frederik Herzberg. A Simple Possibility Result in a Boolean-Valued Model for Judgment Aggregation
12:30-14:00 Lunch
14:00-15:00 Invited Talk by Prof. Dr. John-Jules Meyer (Utrecht University, NL). The Logic of Emotion
15:00-15:30 Andreas Herzig, Emiliano Lorini, Faustine Maffre and Dirk Walther. Alternating-time Temporal Logic with Explicit Programs
15:30-16:00 Coffee Break
16:00-16:30 Fabio Mogavero, Aniello Murano and Luigi Sauro. On the Conjunctive and Disjunctive Fragments of Strategy Logic
16:30-16:45 Bozena Wozna-Szczesniak. Checking EMTLK properties of Timed Interpreted Systems via Bounded Model Checking
16:45-17:00 Stefania Costantini and Giovanni De Gasperis. Runtime Self-Checking via Temporal (Meta-)Axioms for Assurance of Logical Agent Systems
17:00-17:15 Natasha Alechina, Fenrong Liu and Brian Logan. Postulates and a linear-time algorithm for minimal preference contraction
17:15-18:00 Panel Discussion and Closing

Keynote Speakers

Inivited talk by Prof. John-Jules Meyer (Utrecht University, NL)

Prof.dr. John-Jules Ch. Meyer studied Mathematics with Computer Science and Digital Signal Processing at Leyden University. He obtained his Ph.D. from the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam on a subject in theoretical computer science. From 1988 to 1993 he was a full professor both at the VU in Amsterdam and the University of Nijmegen. Since 1993 he has been a full professor of computer science, and artificial intelligence in particular, at Utrecht University. He has over 400 peer-reviewed publications in international journals and conference proceedings. In 2005 he was appointed as a Fellow of the European Coordinating Committee for Artificial Intelligence.

Title of talk: The Logic of Emotions

Abstract: Emotions have long been regarded as irrational. So perhaps, at first sight, it is rather strange to talk about the logic of emotion. However, if we look at the various aspects of emotions, viz. appraisal / triggering, effect on behaviour, experience, and emotion regulation (coping), we see that these are processes, which can be described logically. Interestingly, all four aspects / processes mentioned above follow their own logic, so to speak. So I’ll talk about the logic of emotion triggering (appraisal), the logic of effects on agent behaviour (deliberation, action tendency), the logic of (intensity of) experience of emotions, and the logic of emotion regulation (coping).

Invited tutorial by Prof. Thomas Ågotnes (University of Bergen, NO)

Thomas Ågotnes is a full Professor of Information Science and head of the Logic, Information and Interaction research group at the University of Bergen (Norway), and a visiting professor at the Institute of Logic and Intelligence, Southwest University (China), and at the School of Computer Science, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa. His main interests is multi-agent systems, in particular the use of formal logic to model, analyse and reason about interaction in multi-agent systems, and he has worked and published extensively in these areas. Ågotnes was a co-winner of the best paper award at AAMAS in 2009, on a logical analysis of social laws. He is an active member of the international multi-agent systems community, and is a member of the board of directors of the European Association for Multi-Agent Systems (EURAMAS), a member of the steering committe of the CLIMA workshop series, is a PC chair of LOFT 2014, and was a PC chair of DEON 2012 and the general chair of STAIRS 2010.

Title of tutorial: The Social Laws Paradigm for Coordinating Multi-Agent Systems

Abstract: Social laws (or normative systems) have emerged as a natural and powerful paradigm for coordinating such systems, exposing the whole spectrum between fully centralised and fully decentralised coordination mechanisms. A social law is, intuitively, a constraint on the behaviour of agents, which ensures that their individual behaviours are compatible. In a standard multi-agent state transition diagram (where transitions are labelled with the name of the agent effecting the transition), a social law is simply a labelling of the transitions saying whether or not they are “legal”, or “desirable”. An illegal transition could, for example, correspond to a component malfunctioning. Different normative systems give rise to different global system properties, assuming that the social law is complied with. Such properties can be specified and analysed in temporal modal logic. However, it might be that not all agents/components comply, either deliberately or because of a malfunction. In the talk I will, in addition to introducing and motivating the idea of social laws, discuss (non-)compliance from two angles. First: when is it rational for an agent to comply? Since the properties of the resulting system depend on compliance of all the agents in the system (think of the norm “drive on the right side of the road”), this requires a game theoretic analysis. Second, how can we identify the most important agents/components in the system, the agents whose compliance is crucial for the proper functioning of the system? I will talk about some resulting decision problems, combining logic, game theory, voting theory and complexity theory.